Internet Spam

The origin of using the name of the Hormel Company canned meat product for junk email is attributed to various sources, including Monty Python. Whatever the origin of the name, spam is a truly major email nuisance. The ease with which large electronic mailing lists can be set up and the essentially cost-free (to the mailer) process of email means that almost anyone can send out huge quantities of advertising or other messages. Around half of all email is estimated to be spam.

How They Find Us

In theory the best defense against spam is stay off the mailing lists. So how do we get there in the first place? Unfortunately, it is almost impossible to keep your email address hidden from determined marketers. Once on a list for any reason, your address may be sold and resold many times until it is on dozens of lists. CDs with millions of email addresses are readily available for a few dollars. Any action that you take that might expose your email address on the Internet can end you up on spammer’s lists. Participation in chat rooms, newsgroup discussions, investment forums are all ways to get on lists. In a practice called “harvesting,” spammers use software called “spiders” to regularly comb the Internet for addresses. Also, many ISPs offer the option of being listed in a directory and these are fair game for advertisers.

Shopping on the Internet, signing up for newsletters, entering contests, registering to download software, or other activity requiring that you provide your email address can also get your name on lists. Although reputable merchants, newsletter writers, shareware sites, etc. will respect your privacy, some sites may feel free to sell your name to others. Always look for a statement of the policy on privacy before signing up for something.

Another method used by spammers is the “dictionary” attack. By combining all common words and names (with variations like joe1, joe2, joe3, etc.) with all the common providers such as AOL, Hotmail, MSN, Earthlink, computer programs can generate millions of possible email addresses. Many of these will be legitimate and the spammer doesn’t care about the ones that bounce. The cost of mailing to a lot of incorrect addresses is too small to be any deterrent. Thus some people advise using uncommon combinations of symbols for your email address.

Everyone should have several disposable junk email address that they use where public exposure is likely. One of the free services like Hotmail or My Yahoo serves admirably for this purpose. If an address starts to attract spam, it can just be discarded.

You can also “munge” your address in places like Newsgroups. To “Munge” is to add easily recognized extra characters to your address along with the accompanying phrase “remove xyz to obtain address”. Thus myname@myISP.com becomes myname@mynospamISP.com. The only trouble is that address harvesting software can be programmed to strip out obvious strings like nospam although many times they don’t bother.

Blocking Spam

One method of dealing with spam is to block or filter mail from known spammers or that contain particular subjects or key words. This can be done either on your email program or with special software. The common email programs like Outlook Express allow for setting up rules that apply to categories like senders, subjects, and textual content. Check your particular email client for the details. For example, in Outlook Express go to the menu under Tools-Message Rules. The problem is that spammers keep changing or faking their ostensible names and addresses as well as using phony subjects. Personally, I have found that rules and filtering within my email program may keep out some spam but that it is only a partial answer to the problem. You can also install some extra software. There are a slew of utilities devoted to stopping spam. The best types of programs use a statistical technique known as Bayesian filtering. These programs set up filtering rules based on actual experience and “learn” how to improve filters from the email that you receive. See the sidebar for references on this technique and on various software programs.

Businesses and those who are big users of email will need some heavy-duty methods of filtering spam but average PC users who receive only a few emails each day can use a program like MailWasher Pro. Also, ISPs are getting better at filtering and may also provide some way for individual users to create filtering rules.

There are also services that will filter your mail. By collecting large databases of known spammers and using their client’s emails to keep up with the latest tricks and twists of the spammers, these services can be better at stopping spam than software located on your own computer. These services naturally slow down the processing of your mail since it has to go through their server. Several are listed in the sidebar.

Note that no matter whether you filter mail with software on your own computer or use an external service, some spam will get through and some legitimate mail will get blocked.

Although there are many ways to try to block spam from arriving in your mailbox by using software or filtering services, my experience is that spam has reached the point where one of the best defenses is to have more than one email address. You can reserve one address for friends and relatives and have a second throwaway address that is changed fairly regularly. This second address would be the one that is used whenever it might be subject to public exposure. Many ISPs allow for an account to have multiple mailboxes and one can be set aside for junk. If the volume builds up, the box can be discarded and replaced by a new one. Another route is to use one of the free Internet email services like Yahoo or Hotmail. Yet another approach is to use one of the services that provide email addresses with a limited lifetime. For example, SpamGourmet will give you addresses good for a certain number of uses only.

The last and perhaps best defense is common sense and the “delete” key. Don’t open obvious spam messages and be very careful about responding to “Remove me from this list” type of addresses. That may very well just get you on more lists. Also note that formatted spam may contain Web Bugs that tell the spammer if you have opened that mail.

“Phishing”- an Internet scam

“Phishing” is a form of identity theft that used to be done over the telephone. Now, however, the crooks have gone high-tech and are using the Internet for their con games. Most commonly this consists of sending out emails purporting to be from a legitimate source such as a financial institution. Under some false pretense, such as the claim that your account needs verifying, an email will ask that you go to a Web site by clicking on a link in the email. When you go to the Web site, you are asked to “update” or “confirm” personal information such as account numbers and passwords. The Web sites may look just like a legitimate page but they are bogus sites designed to steal from your accounts. The link in the email may read like it leads to an authentic site but actually takes you to a fake page.

The first large-scale example of “phishing” was several years ago when many AOL users were tricked into divulging their passwords. Their accounts were then used for the scammer’s purposes. Since then, many other institutions have been attacked. For example, in 2003 many people received emails supposedly from eBay claiming that the user’s account was about to be suspended unless they clicked on the provided link and updated their credit card information. The scammers use mass-mailing methods and many of the recipients did not even have an eBay account. However, all it takes is 1 or 2 per cent responses for the con to result in a nice haul.

Recently, banks have been a favorite target of “phishing”. An example of a scam email that I recently received is shown below.

phishexample

Note the psychological tricks known as social engineering in the email. The very problem that we are concerned with- identity theft- is brazenly used as a way to induce you to allow identity theft. It plays on your fears. Moreover, the email looks like a real Citicorp email. Also, note that although the link in the email contains the name “Citibank”, it has nothing to do with Citibank. In fact, the link that appears in the text of the message is likely to have little relation to the actual link contained in the underlying HTML code. To see the real link in an email message, right-click on the text and choose “Properties” from the context menu. To see an example of a faked link, try this one that seems to be from a familiar company (but isn’t): http://www.microsoft.com.

Another trick that is used is to take you to a page that uses JavaScript to generate a pop-up form and then redirect you to the actual bank site. What then appears on your screen is a fake form on top of a legitimate page.

Here is another example of “phishing”:
phishexample2

ISPs, banks, etc. do not ask for passwords and the like to be entered by email. Be suspicious of any email message that asks for personal information. Don’t ever follow a link in an email that asks you to update or verify sensitive information. If you want to contact a company, go to their Web site by using a link from your records or telephone them.

If you would like to test how good you are at recognizing “phishing” messages go to this quiz site where examples of actual “phishing” are mixed with legitimate mail.

The sidebar lists a number of references on “phishing”, including what to do if you think you have been scammed. You should also report scam efforts to your bank or other account.

How to Read Email with Greater Safety

For the most part, the greatest danger in email in the past has been from opening executable attachments containing viruses, worms, Trojans, etc. and I have discussed this subject previously. Using common sense about clicking on attachments, keeping anti-virus programs and the operating system patches up-to-date, and some system configuration should prevent infectious attachments from harming your system. With increasing frequency, however, the email body itself has become a source of infection. By means of HTML code or scripts hidden in the text, malware may get downloaded simply from the act of opening an email for viewing. It is also possible for spammers to track you this way (Web bugs, see sidebar). In this article, I will discuss some ways to avoid getting malware from the main email body.

Turn off the Preview Pane

For convenience, many email programs provide automatic views of email called the “Preview Pane.” Unfortunately, this means that any malicious code in the email body may get executed also. Or a signal may be sent to a spammer showing that you are reading the message. Steps can be taken to help allow safe use of the Preview pane but some may prefer to be sure and will want to turn off this feature. That way only mail that you deliberately choose to open will be displayed. Different email programs will have somewhat different procedures for disabling the Preview pane but I will give the method for the commonly used Windows email client Outlook Express (OE).

Go to the “View” menu, click “Layout” and uncheck “Show Preview Pane”. The procedure is illustrated in a tutorial with pictures showing how to configure OE for safety. Configuring the Preview pane is demonstrated on slides 7 and 8 of this tutorial. Also see slide 4 to see how to turn off automatic downloads in the Preview Pane.

Another way of turning the Preview Pane on and off in OE uses a sequence of keyboard shortcuts. First hold down “Alt” and “v”. This will open the “View” menu. Then in succession, press “l” “p” and “Enter.” Note that this is “l” for “Layout” and “p” for “Preview Pane”.

I do not use the more complicated application Outlook that is part of Microsoft Office but the Outlook feature “AutoPreview” (but not “Preview Pane) is said to be safe to use.

Configure system

The latest versions of OE and Outlook have several security measures in place by default but it doesn’t hurt to check. Make sure that OE is in the so-called “Restricted sites zone”. Go to the “Tools” menu and open “Options”. Click the “security” tab. Make sure the radio button is selected next to “Restricted site zone.” This procedure is detailed in the tutorial previously mentioned.

Read text only

In order to avoid any hidden HTML or scripts, email can be checked out by first reading it in text only. OE has a setting to provide for this. Go to Tools-Options-Read and place a check by “Read all messages in plain text”. This will disable all graphics and formatting so it may look a little funny but no viruses or spammer’s trackers will be able to run. If a message seems legitimate, the graphics can be turned back on. This procedure is illustrated in slide 4 of the tutorial.

Another way to read an email in text in OE is to right-click on the entry in the message list and then select “Properties”. Click the “Details” tab and then click the button “Message Source”. (See the fgure below.) This method allows for selectively reading messages in text without changing the configuration.

oeprop1

Reading on the server

Rather than bringing email to your computer and reading it locally with your own email client, you can also read the mail in text while it is still on the email server. If your mail account is of the usual POP3 variety, the free program MailWasher is a handy way to check out mail before downloading it. IMAP accounts or those with AOL or Hotmail can use the commercial cousin MailWasher Pro ($37).

Taporinx “Virus” Removal (Android/iOS)

If you find yourself being bothered by different pop-ups and banners that get displayed onto your device’s screen or you get frequent redirects from the newly set search engine and/or homepage in your Chrome, Firefox or Safari browser, then you’ve probably had Taporinx “Virus” installed onto your smartphone or tablet. This is a potentially unwanted application of the Browser Hijacker type and though it is not some sort of malicious virus such as Ransomware or a Trojan horse, we do believe that uninstalling and fully removing Browser Hijackers from one’s device is the best course of action. You can find instructions on how to do that within our removal guide below, but before you go there, read the rest of this article to learn more essential information regarding Taporinx “Virus” and Browser Hijackers in general.

Are Hijackers threatening?

As was said earlier, software the likes of Taporinx is normally not harmful or threatening on its own. Nevertheless, it could still potentially make your device more vulnerable to actual security threats the likes of Trojans, Spyware, Ransomware, etc. For example, some of the pop-ups that get generated by the intrusive software can potentially serve as links to websites that could be illegal and dangerous. That is why we advise our readers to do everything they can so as to avoid interacting with anything coming from the Hijacker. Note that the annoying banners generated by it are unlikely to go away unless the application that causes them is fully removed from your device.

Distribution of Hijackers

Most users that have gotten Taporinx on their smartphone or tablet have done so by having had installed a certain application that contained the Hijacker. There are a lot of applications out there that seem fine and reliable but once they get installed, the user realizes that they’ve gotten more than they’ve bargained for.

A good piece of advice in order to prevent this from happening to you in the future would be to avoid downloading applications that are not from the Google Play Store or the AppStore. However, oftentimes this is not enough to prevent Hijackers from getting inside your system, which is why an additional precaution that you should always take would be to research applications that you want to install if you are not certain about how safe they are. Bear in mind that sometimes the rating system and the reviews in the Store are manipulated through use of fake profiles, so do not always fully trust what you see there.

Taporinx “Virus” Removal

iOS Removal Guide

STEP 1

If you have any popup ads that are open at this time, you will need to close them all.

  • Before closing the ad, check to see whether or not the pop-up has a box called “Don’t show more alerts from this webpage”. If it does, be sure to tick it.
  • After you close the ad, a “Block Alerts” button may appear on your screen. If this happens, be sure to tap the button in order for you to no longer receive alerts from that page.

In the event that the above instructions did not succeed in closing the pop-up:

  • If this is happenning on your Mac desktop computer, you will need to close your Safari browser by force. To do that, use the following key combination: Command-Option-Esc. A list of apps will appear, where you will need to locate and select Safari. Force close it. After this, restart the browser and press and hold the Shift key on your keyboard, once the browser opens. This will stop any ads from appearing.
  • If you are using an iPod Touch, an iPhone or iPad, double-press the home button. The screen will then show you all the most recently used applications. Swipe until you have located Safari and then swipe it up so as to close it forcibly. After this, head over to Settings -> Safari -> Clear History, as well as Website Data. This will prevent ads from opening automatically when you open your browser. But note that the above will also delete your browsing history and cookies, so be sure to export them if they are important to you.

STEP 2

In the Safari menu, select Preferences. Then:

  1. Click on the Security icon, after which click on the “Block pop-up windows” option. This will prevent a large variety of different pop-ups from appearing.
  1. Once this is done, check the homepage and search engine settings in your browser. Adware often tends to change those. We can’t offer any more specific guides as to how to do that, due to the fact that they may vary from browser to browser.
    • Click on the General icon and notice the Homepage field. Make sure that it is either empty or contains the URL of the Homepage of your choice.
    • Do the same for the Search icon. It should, again, display either the default search engine or the one you had appointed yourself. Please note that in certain versions of Safari you will be able to find these settings in the General panel.

STEP 3

Open your Safari browser and click the Extensions button. Most of the time Adware programs rely on integrating extensions with your browser, so as to generate the pop-ups that appear on your screen. Scan the extensions and take note of those you don’t recall installing. Be sure to then remove them all, as they were most probably placed there by the Adware. 

Android Removal Guide

STEP 1

Regardless of the type of browser you are currently using, be it the default “Internet” App or another one, such as Google Chrome, head over to:
Settings/More/Application Manager/All

Find the Browser or the App you’re using and tap on it.

STEP 2

Here you will basically be doing the same thing if you’re using the “Internet” App, or a different browser of your choice, such as Chrome or others. However, below are instructions for both cases:

For user of the “Internet” App:

Tap the Force Stop button.

Move down and tap the Clear Data and Clear Cache Buttons.

For Google Chrome Users:

Tap on  Force Stop.

Then tap on the buttons labelled as Clear Data and Clear Cache.

STEP 3

Restart your browser. You might want to consider rebooting your Android device, as well.

Were we able to help? Please help us, too, and spread the word!

Modern App Virus Warning Removal

This guide was created to help iPhone users remove the Modern App virus warning.

The current article will give you some important information regarding an iPhone application known as Modern App Virus Warning that many people have reported as potentially unwanted due to its obstructive and intrusive behavior. What this app does once it gets installed onto the user’s iPhone is it starts to display unpleasant banners on the device’s screen and might also cause its Safari, Chrome or Firefox browser to get redirected to random sites (some of which might be potentially dangerous). Such behavior is usually associated with a type of potentially unwanted software known as Browser Hijacker. If you currently have Modern App Virus Warning on your Apple smartphone and are trying to have it uninstalled and removed, there is a guide down below which will show you how to do it so that you won’t need to seek professional support.

More About Browser Hijackers

Many people’s first thought when they find out there’s a Hijacker on their smartphone is that the unwanted software is some sort of malicious and harmful virus. In reality, applications like Modern App Virus Warning aren’t really all that problematic as long as you know how to remove them and as long as you remember to be careful around them. Although many specialists refer to Browser Hijackers as malware, there is certainly a big difference between applications like Modern App Virus Warning and noxious viruses the likes of Ransomware, Trojan Horses, Spyware, Worms and so on and so forth. Keep in mind that most apps that can be categorized as Browser Hijackers are normally not used to do any harm to one’s device. The primary purpose of this type of software is earning money through Internet marketing and even though oftentimes the advertising methods that are used are rather aggressive, this still does not mean that the Hijacker is going to harm your smartphone.

However, one should bear in mind that there are still potential risks that might come from applications such as this one. Though it normally would not try to harm your device, the banners and page redirects that it causes could expose the iPhone to various security hazards. Therefore, you ought to make sure to avoid the banners and close any websites that the Hijacker has opened for you.

Software bundling

The method that most Hijacker creators use to spread their programs is what most people know as software bundling. With this technique, the software is integrated within another application which enables it to get installed onto the user’s device without getting noticed. A good measure against this would be to always make sure to use the App Store when downloading new applications. Additionally, we also advise you to carry out your own research on apps that you want to install even if they are from the App Store – this will further decrease the chances of you landing a Browser Hijacker.

Modern App Virus Warning Removal

STEP 1

If you have any popup ads that are open at this time, you will need to close them all.

  • Before closing the ad, check to see whether or not the pop-up has a box called “Don’t show more alerts from this webpage”. If it does, be sure to tick it.
  • After you close the ad, a “Block Alerts” button may appear on your screen. If this happens, be sure to tap the button in order for you to no longer receive alerts from that page.

In the event that the above instructions did not succeed in closing the pop-up:

  • If this is happenning on your Mac desktop computer, you will need to close your Safari browser by force. To do that, use the following key combination: Command-Option-Esc. A list of apps will appear, where you will need to locate and select Safari. Force close it. After this, restart the browser and press and hold the Shift key on your keyboard, once the browser opens. This will stop any ads from appearing.
  • If you are using an iPod Touch, an iPhone or iPad, double-press the home button. The screen will then show you all the most recently used applications. Swipe until you have located Safari and then swipe it up so as to close it forcibly. After this, head over to Settings -> Safari -> Clear History, as well as Website Data. This will prevent ads from opening automatically when you open your browser. But note that the above will also delete your browsing history and cookies, so be sure to export them if they are important to you.

STEP 2

In the Safari menu, select Preferences. Then:

  1. Click on the Security icon, after which click on the “Block pop-up windows” option. This will prevent a large variety of different pop-ups from appearing.
  1. Once this is done, check the homepage and search engine settings in your browser. Adware often tends to change those. We can’t offer any more specific guides as to how to do that, due to the fact that they may vary from browser to browser.
    • Click on the General icon and notice the Homepage field. Make sure that it is either empty or contains the URL of the Homepage of your choice.
    • Do the same for the Search icon. It should, again, display either the default search engine or the one you had appointed yourself. Please note that in certain versions of Safari you will be able to find these settings in the General panel.

STEP 3

Open your Safari browser and click the Extensions button. Most of the time Adware programs rely on integrating extensions with your browser, so as to generate the pop-ups that appear on your screen. Scan the extensions and take note of those you don’t recall installing. Be sure to then remove them all, as they were most probably placed there by the Adware. 

Modernappz.net Scam Virus Removal

The following guide was created to remove the Modernappz.net scam virus from users’ iPhones.

Adware programs can be the most annoying type of software you’ll ever encounter and one its most recent representatives has set out to prove that theory. It goes by the name of Modernappz.net Scam Virus and if you have discovered its annoying popups, banners and other online ads on your iPhone, iPad or other portable device – don’t go away. On this page we would like to show you how you can effectively remove Modernappz.net Scam Virus, together with the disturbance that it is likely causing you with its invasive ads. Below is a detailed removal guide that will show you how to rid yourself of the program in question in just a few simple steps. But we’d like you to first read the information presented here.

The purpose of adware and programs like Modernappz.net Scam Virus

You may be wondering how Modernappz.net Scam Virus came to be on your smartphone or tablet and what business it has being there in the first place. Luckily, it’s nothing dangerous or malicious, despite the common misconception that adware is the same as a virus. Adware programs benefit their developers by generating income through the paid clicks on their ads. In other words, the more ads you happen to interact with, the more profit for the developers behind Modernappz.net Scam Virus.

This remuneration model often causes developers to program their ad-generating software to extract browsing-related data from each separate user. They can, for example, be interested in the kinds of things you type into your search engine or the websites you tend to spend the most time on. Based on this data, the adware can then tailor its advertising campaigns to the preferences of each separate user. However, the practice is an undesirable one and in the majority of cases is frowned upon in the online community. This is also one of the reasons why you may want to consider removing Modernappz.net Scam Virus from your device.

But there’s also the possibility of being exposed to viruses such as Trojans, ransomware, worms and other by being constantly bombarded with online ads. For this reason we recommend abstaining from any interaction with popups, banners and other advertising materials. The best way to ensure the safety of your iPhone or iPad from now on is to be more careful with the apps you download from the App Store. Be sure to research the app you’re interested in downloading before actually doing so, as adware usually comes integrated with other apps.

Modernappz.net Scam Virus Removal

STEP 1

If you have any popup ads that are open at this time, you will need to close them all.

  • Before closing the ad, check to see whether or not the pop-up has a box called “Don’t show more alerts from this webpage”. If it does, be sure to tick it.
  • After you close the ad, a “Block Alerts” button may appear on your screen. If this happens, be sure to tap the button in order for you to no longer receive alerts from that page.

In the event that the above instructions did not succeed in closing the pop-up:

  • If this is happenning on your Mac desktop computer, you will need to close your Safari browser by force. To do that, use the following key combination: Command-Option-Esc. A list of apps will appear, where you will need to locate and select Safari. Force close it. After this, restart the browser and press and hold the Shift key on your keyboard, once the browser opens. This will stop any ads from appearing.
  • If you are using an iPod Touch, an iPhone or iPad, double-press the home button. The screen will then show you all the most recently used applications. Swipe until you have located Safari and then swipe it up so as to close it forcibly. After this, head over to Settings -> Safari -> Clear History, as well as Website Data. This will prevent ads from opening automatically when you open your browser. But note that the above will also delete your browsing history and cookies, so be sure to export them if they are important to you.

STEP 2

In the Safari menu, select Preferences. Then:

  1. Click on the Security icon, after which click on the “Block pop-up windows” option. This will prevent a large variety of different pop-ups from appearing.
  1. Once this is done, check the homepage and search engine settings in your browser. Adware often tends to change those. We can’t offer any more specific guides as to how to do that, due to the fact that they may vary from browser to browser.
    • Click on the General icon and notice the Homepage field. Make sure that it is either empty or contains the URL of the Homepage of your choice.
    • Do the same for the Search icon. It should, again, display either the default search engine or the one you had appointed yourself. Please note that in certain versions of Safari you will be able to find these settings in the General panel.

STEP 3

Open your Safari browser and click the Extensions button. Most of the time Adware programs rely on integrating extensions with your browser, so as to generate the pop-ups that appear on your screen. Scan the extensions and take note of those you don’t recall installing. Be sure to then remove them all, as they were most probably placed there by the Adware. 

“Your apple iPhone is infected by 6 viruses” Scam Removal

The following guide was created to help iPhone users remove the “Your apple iPhone is infected by 6 viruses” scam from their machines.

Because you have landed on this page, we’re guessing you have joined the ranks of those non-believers, who thought Apple products were immune to adware. Unfortunately, that is not the case, as the numerous popups, banners and other ads that have filled your browser will probably suggest. However, we’re not here to gloat – we want to offer a helping hand and show you how to remove the annoying program called “Your apple iPhone is infected by 6 viruses” Scam, together with all the ads it brought with it. Below is a set of detailed removal instructions that will help you accomplish just that. But before heading on to them, we would recommend sticking around for some more valuable information regarding “Your apple iPhone is infected by 6 viruses” Scam and other programs like it.

What does adware do and how did it end up on my device?

Adware programs like “Your apple iPhone is infected by 6 viruses” Scam are designed to earn revenue for their developers and ensure the promotion of numerous products and services by means of generating ads on the user’s device, thus constantly exposing them to the said ads. As a result, the developers get paid based on the amount of times the ads got tapped by the user. And in order to achieve as much profit as possible, the adware also tends to gather browsing-related data from the user’s iPhone, iPad or other portable device. Usually this includes the websites you visit, the content you demonstrate interest towards and your most recent online search requests.

Thanks to this information, programs like “Your apple iPhone is infected by 6 viruses” Scam can then alter the stream of ads they’re displaying to show ads that are more relevant to each individual user. That way they increase their chances of actually attracting the user’s attention and, therefore, making more profit. However, not many users would agree with the idea of having their online movements being so closely monitored and being subjected to the privacy invasion that this practice represents. This is often one of the reasons why people choose to remove the annoying software, rather than have to put up with its intrusive ads.

Furthermore, programs like these can actually make your device more vulnerable to external threats like viruses, spyware, ransomware and more. In fact, ransomware viruses most commonly depend on malicious and fake ads for their effective distribution, so it’s important that you remain very careful around any popups or other ads that come your way. Try to avoid interacting with them, as you never know what could be hiding inside them.

“Your apple iPhone is infected by 6 viruses” Scam Removal

STEP 1

If you have any popup ads that are open at this time, you will need to close them all.

  • Before closing the ad, check to see whether or not the pop-up has a box called “Don’t show more alerts from this webpage”. If it does, be sure to tick it.
  • After you close the ad, a “Block Alerts” button may appear on your screen. If this happens, be sure to tap the button in order for you to no longer receive alerts from that page.

In the event that the above instructions did not succeed in closing the pop-up:

  • If this is happenning on your Mac desktop computer, you will need to close your Safari browser by force. To do that, use the following key combination: Command-Option-Esc. A list of apps will appear, where you will need to locate and select Safari. Force close it. After this, restart the browser and press and hold the Shift key on your keyboard, once the browser opens. This will stop any ads from appearing.
  • If you are using an iPod Touch, an iPhone or iPad, double-press the home button. The screen will then show you all the most recently used applications. Swipe until you have located Safari and then swipe it up so as to close it forcibly. After this, head over to Settings -> Safari -> Clear History, as well as Website Data. This will prevent ads from opening automatically when you open your browser. But note that the above will also delete your browsing history and cookies, so be sure to export them if they are important to you.

STEP 2

In the Safari menu, select Preferences. Then:

  1. Click on the Security icon, after which click on the “Block pop-up windows” option. This will prevent a large variety of different pop-ups from appearing.
  1. Once this is done, check the homepage and search engine settings in your browser. Adware often tends to change those. We can’t offer any more specific guides as to how to do that, due to the fact that they may vary from browser to browser.
    • Click on the General icon and notice the Homepage field. Make sure that it is either empty or contains the URL of the Homepage of your choice.
    • Do the same for the Search icon. It should, again, display either the default search engine or the one you had appointed yourself. Please note that in certain versions of Safari you will be able to find these settings in the General panel.

STEP 3

Open your Safari browser and click the Extensions button. Most of the time Adware programs rely on integrating extensions with your browser, so as to generate the pop-ups that appear on your screen. Scan the extensions and take note of those you don’t recall installing. Be sure to then remove them all, as they were most probably placed there by the Adware. 

“Event 1001 – 0x8e KERNEL_MODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED” Fix

The guide below has been designed to work on all versions of the Windows OS. Hopefully, the advice and the instructions presented in the guide will be enough to get Event 1001 solved. In case they don’t, please explain your particular problem in detail by leaving a comment below. And, of course, if you have found a successful solution for Event 1001, different from the one we have suggested, let us know as well. We will be thankful and very happy to include it in our article.

What kind of issue is Event 1001?

This problem could affect both new systems and those that have been used for quite some time. What happens is that the PC restarts from a bugcheck and another message appears: “0x8E error, KERNEL_  MODE_EXCEPTION _NOT_ HANDLED”. This error is usually connected to the lack of a driver or the need for BIOS upgrade and appears to be really frustrating to the users.

What can you do to solve Event 1001?

“Event 1001 – 0x8e KERNEL_MODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED” Fix

#1:Try Running CHKDSK

What CHKDSK represents is a built-in Microsoft tool. What it is designed to do is to check your drives for errors and corruptions. Then it helps you solve the found issues. Use it in the way described below and you may be able to get this error fixed:

* Press the Windows key on your keyboard.

* Enter Command Prompt.

* When the result comes up, choose Run as administrator.

* In the Command Prompt dialog box, enter the command below:

chkdsk C: /f

Important tip! You should use the letter of the disk or the partition where your OS is installed in this command. If you go with the /f parameter, it will set CHKDSK try to solve any issues it could detect on your disks.

* Restart your computer to enable the CHKDSK scan.

* Then simply wait until the completion of the  scan.

Now your issue should have been fixed and possibly all your PC errors resolved and your system should have become more stable, as CHKDSK will also get any other potential errors solved.

 get_the_issue_event1001_solved_1

#2: Sometimes simply updating your drivers could help

You can get this issue solved and your drivers updated in two ways: automatically and manually. For the automatic completion of this task you should use Windows Update. Then you are shoould right-click on every single driver and apply the available updates from the context menu.

Still, if in your case Microsoft hasn’t presented the best drivers for some devices to you, you may want to manually update all the drivers that need to be upgraded using their manufacturer’s website.

*Hit the Windows and R buttons on your keyboard at the same time to bring up the Run dialog box.

* Once there, enter devmgmt.msc.

* Then click OK or hit the Enter button on your keyboard.

* The next step is to expand the devices in your Device Manager.

After that right-click a given device, and choose Properties from the menu. Check the version of the current driver installed on your PC from the Driver tab. Then simply do an online search for the newest available drivers for your system, using the particular device’s name. If there are any possible updates, download them and install them.  

Please note that the steps above should be repeated for all your devices.

Now you should have fixed that bothering error, causing the constant rebooting of your PC and making it unusable to you.

Nvlddmkm.sys BSOD Error in Win10/7 Fix

In the following article and guide manual we will be focusing on what causes the irritating nvlddmkm.sys BSOD error and how you can fix it so it does not appear any more.

Blue Screen of Death (BSOD) crashes are not uncommon and there are very many different potential causes for them. The issue might be both with your hardware and your software and oftentimes it is difficult to determine where the problem actually lies. However, if the error message is something among the lines of display driver nvlddmkm.sys stopped responding and has successfully recovered and/or contains the following code 0x0000001E, then the cause for the crash is probably within your Nvidia driver. Most users report to receive the nvlddmkm.sys when trying to run some PC game. Sometimes, the crash might occur some time after the game has started and sometimes it will happen right after you’ve tried to launch it. Whatever the case, the method to fix the issue should be the same. In the following short guide we will show you the different steps that you need to execute in order to have the problem solved.

Nvlddmkm.sys BSOD Error in Win10/7 Fix

  1. First thing you need to do is download the latest Nvidia driver. Follow this link to the official Nvidia website. There you can download the exact driver update for your system. You can either manually search for it or let the website find the driver you need to download.
    • Note that if you go for the automatic option, you’d need to first download and install a JAVA app, which will scan your system in order to determine which driver your system needs.
  1. Once you’ve downloaded the driver, install it by opening the executable file and following the prompts.
  2. Next, you’d need to go to C:\Windows\System32\Drivers and find a file named nvlddmkm.sys. Rename that file to nvlddmkm.sys.old.
    1
  3. Now, go to the folder where the Nvidia driver was installed. It should usually either be C:\Nvidia or C:\drvvganVidia. Once there, find a file named nvlddmkm.sy_. Copy that file and paste it on your Desktop.
  4. Open your Start Menu and in the search bar type cmd.
  5. Right-click on the first result and select Open as Administrator.
    2
  6. In the resulting window, type in the following command and hit Enter: chdir Desktop.
    3
  7. After that, type in another command in the command prompt and hit Enter again: EXPAND.EXE nvlddmkm.sy_ nvlddmkm.sys.4
  8. Now, a new file should be created on your Desktop named nvlddmkm.sys. Copy that file and paste it in the Drivers folder (C:\Windows\System32\Drivers).
  9. Restart your computer.

Your problem with the nvlddmkm.sys error should have been fixed and you should no longer receive the BSOD crash screen when trying to run a PC game.

Please let us know in the comment section below if our fix was able to to solve the issue for you. Have you found a better solution? Then please don’t hesitate to share it with us either, we will be happy to include your solution in our guide, so more users can benefit from it. 

 

“This Device Is Not Configured Correctly” Fix

The potential solutions in the guide you will find below have been prepared with extra care and effort by our experts. They are intended to be efficient for all Windows operating systems.

The error that is being discussed in the following article represents an error message telling you a particular device does not have drivers installed on your PC, or its drivers have been configured in an incorrect manner. The exact text in the pop-up alert that you receive normally states: ‘The device is not configured properly.

In case such an error pop-up message has appeared on your screen, the device that is connected to this problem will not start functioning properly until you get that driver-related issue solved. It is possible to experience such an error with all versions of devices – sound devices, flash drives, smartphones. However, again, we are reminding you that this issue is connected to the state of your drivers, not to the condition of your hardware. Don’t falsely believe you have hardware-related problems.

“This Device Is Not Configured Correctly” Error Fix

Potential solution №1: Check whether updating the device drivers will help

The steps in the guide below will walk you through the process of updating the drivers for the given problematic device.

  1. Load your Device Manager (simply press the Windows key on your keyboard and enter Device Manager; after that load the result from your search);
    device_manager_open
  2. Expand all the menus within the Device Manager. Look for the malfunctioning one. Such a device could easily be recognized by the yellow exclamation mark before its name.
    1_not_configured_device
  3. After that, select it. From the menu bar at the top, choose the Action menu. From there go with Update Driver Software…
    not_configured_correctly_1

Now you are just supposed to follow the instructions in the wizard. Normally, it finds the necessary drivers automatically and installs them. When the installation of the drivers is done, you will be ready to RESTART your PC. After the REBOOT everything should be alright.

An alternative solution:

  1. Maybe you will get this error message and your will have NO SOUND. The problems with the sound drivers are typically fixed in another manner.
  2. To do that, expand the menu with the Sound, video and game controllers. From there, go with the IDT High Definition Audio CODEC. Click on the the Action tab. After that choose Update Driver Software… .
  3. Select Browse my computer for driver software. Then continue with Let me pick from a list of device drivers on my computer.
  4. From the generated list, choose the High Definition Audio Device driver. Then, in case you see a warning message, just click Yes. 
    Now wait until the wizard finishes and restarts your computer. After the reboot, you should not be experiencing any issues anymore.

Potential solution №2: Maybe if  you remove the UpperFilters and LowerFilters for USB from the registry, the problem will be fixed

Please bear in mind that this particular potential solution demands extra carefulness and attention from you.

Unfortunately, if you do something wrong to your registry, that could result in possible serious problems and errors, which may even require a complete reinstall of your OS. Stick to the steps below very closely:

  1. Load the Run dialogue box. (This is possible if you push the Windows and the R keys on your keyboard at the same time).
  2. Once there, enter regedit in the box. Follow it with a click on OK.
  3. The Registry Editor will be loaded.
  4. Make sure that you back it up. For that purpose, open File from the menu bar. Then go with Next.
    Ensure that the Export Range is set to All. Save the newly-created back-up file. 
  5. Use the navigation pane in the left part and find the location belowHKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE -> System -> CurrentControlSet -> Control -> Class
  6. As soon as you have reached and expanded all the folders mentioned above, go with the {36FC9E60-C465-11CF-8056-444553540000} key to choose it.
  7. From the right-hand pane, mark and delete both the UpperFilters key, and the LowerFilters. Press OK to confirm the action.
  8. Exit the Registry Editor.
  9. Restart your device. This will let the changes take effect.
  10. Everything should be error-free and completely functional at the end.