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Twitter Roundup – December 10: light bulbs with longevity, recycling jeans into cars, and China’s cap on emissions

   /   Dec 10th, 2010Environment, News

Search for the hashtag #socent and you’ll find wide-ranging interest in social entrepreneurship on Twitter. Here’s a roundup of a few interesting tweets from the last week:

The GE Energy Smart LED. Energy-efficient with a 22.8 year life. It's the world's first onmidirectional LED... http://fb.me/HUz8VSRN
@GELighting
GELighting

This week GE (@GE_Reports) released a new light bulb that promises to last a whopping 22.8 years. Called the “Energy Smart LED” it uses a 9-watt LED bulb and its makers promise it looks a lot like a traditional incandescent light when turned on. What’s the downside? It costs $50. But they estimate the energy savings over the life of the bulb is around $85.

In an article on AltTransport (@alttransport) this week, we learned that the interior of each 2012 Ford Focus will include the recycled cotton from two pairs of blue jeans, used as sound absorption and carpet backing. Ford believes that recycling jeans is a way to keep potential waste out of landfills and make their cars more sustainable.

News [Reuters]: China says can make voluntary CO2 curbs "binding" ;http://reut.rs/dGmNDY #COP16, #Cancun

At the U.N. climate talks this week in Cancun, China made a new offer to make its extensive and ambitious carbon emissions targets a binding promise. Since the current round of Kyoto Protocol carbon caps expire in 2012, there has been a rush to find a new solution that will work for most countries. China’s move, according to some analysts, could put pressure on developed countries to extend the Kyoto Protocol again and bring down carbon emissions across the world. We’re looking forward to seeing how this develops.

A team of developers in conjunction with the World Wildlife Fund (@WWF) announced last week that they had released a new file format with the extension .wwf on the Internet. What does it do? It’s basically a PDF document, except without the option to print. “Save as WWF, Save a Tree” is the motto, and it’s available as free software for your computer. Most PDF reader programs can open the files, but it prevents printing across all platforms.

What’d we miss? Let us know in the comments or find us @dowserDOTorg.

One Response

  1. Multiunits says:

    Re: GE’s Energy Smart LED with a 22.8 year life and a $50 price tag. Use of energy efficient technologies will remain low as long as consumers get financially raped buying them.